Trish’s ‘Warm Down to Your Toes’ Red Lentil Soup

Grey skies with hint of blue
Winter nights are cold in Tucson. No really, bloody cold. Just not holy crap Scotland cold. A couple of nights ago the temperatures dropped down to 23 degrees Fahrenheit. My resolve to not turn the heating on until Solstice is gone. The water pipes to the swamp cooler are also shot. And water is pouring off the roof. My worries about baked chickens in the coop have flipped to worries about frozen chickens. Could I knit them little sweaters? Do Brussels Sprouts get frost bite?
Brussels

In honor of these frosty times I share Trish’s fabulous Red Lentil Soup with a few modifications because I’m not good about following recipes.

Olive Oil (a few glugs as my online friend Debbie would say)
Onion – chopped
Approx 3 cloves of garlic – chopped
Red Bell Pepper chipped
A couple of cans of tomatoes or one can and that bunch of tomatoes in the fridge that aren’t going to be used before they go off otherwise.
2 cups of lentils rinsed and sorted
Tablespoon of curry powder (Oh, how my Indian/Thai cooking teacher would go off on me about this if she knew)
Tablespoon of dried fennel seeds
8 cups of veg. broth

1. Saute onion until soft not brown, then add garlic.
2. Add red peppers and tomatoes in their juice
3. Add tbsp of curry and fennel seed each
4. Wait for fennel seeds to do whatever it is they do and start smelling spectacular
5. Add lentils and broth
6. Bring to boil and simmer until lentils are soft (approx. 1/2 hour)
7. Dip toes in to get warm. Just kidding, consuming via mouth much better idea.

ps. Don’t worry, this British woman isn’t going to subject you to loads of recipes. I know what the commonly held incorrect belief is about British food.

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11 Comments

Filed under "Gastronomic Delights", Domestic Diva

11 responses to “Trish’s ‘Warm Down to Your Toes’ Red Lentil Soup

  1. Hmmm….I do not know any Brits who eat red lentils, even when the Holy Potato is absent. My mother (native of Prescot, near Liverpool, but has lived in the U.S. since 1960) won’t eat any beans except the white kind that come in a can with tomato sauce and a bit of salt pork…and even then, they’re served on white toast with an egg, not with anything as American as cornbread. And she avoids spices like the plague. Good thing she doesn’t have to eat in my kitchen!

  2. dragonflywoman

    Mmm… Lentil soup is delicious! I’ll have to try your recipe.

    We had to “winterize” our chicken coop during the winters in Colorado. We wrapped the whole thing in tarps and added a heating lamp, which kept the inside right around 65 degrees. We kept the door of the coop open all day and sealed them in at night, so our pair could venture out into the snow if they wanted to during the day. They got a lot of fresh air, but were plenty warm at night.

    A couple of strategically placed heat lamps might come in handy for your much larger coop on the really cold nights. They worked wonders with our chickens, though they are supposed to be really resilient to cold too.

  3. Rooting for your brussel sprouts! You can knit them little sweaters too 🙂 And may (just may) even try this recipe. It sounds so good and you give recipes the way I cook, so it might work out. Although I’ve never found a lentil soup I like as much as I like canned. Isn’t that awful? xo

  4. Hello from an english woman, england being part of britain, who has never been to liverpool (yet) never mind prescot, but who was alive in 1960, and for quite some time before then too, and who does indeed eat red lentils, and knits, but has never (yet) knitted jackets for frosty sprouts, and who cooks, the way you give recipes. Sigh. Can I be your friend now? Please?
    pamela x
    ok, yeah, I can eat canned soup too;)

  5. I will try this recipe this weekend! Sounds perfect. I have only been in to making soup on these cold nights as well.

    Hope your brussels are okay!

  6. Mum

    Our brussels sprouts have already got frozen bite and are dying in the fields. The queue for Christmas sprouts has already started as apart from Father Christmas and Turkey a spoutsless Christmas is not possible.

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